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10 Things to Do in Triana in Seville

On the other side of the river is a neighborhood with a peculiar character: Triana. No trip to Seville could be considered complete without passing through here.

Matteo Gramegna

Matteo Gramegna

9 min read

10 Things to Do in Triana in Seville

Triana | ©Guzmán Lozano

Although the Andalusian capital is not on the coast, during the Golden Age it was the most important port in Spain. Indeed, the famous expedition of Magellan and Elcano set sail from the docks of Triana.

This neighborhood on the banks of the Guadalquivir is also known for its flamenco tradition, tapas bars and for being the starting point of river cruises. Without a doubt, visiting it is one of the essential things to see and do in Seville.

How long does it take to visit Triana?

Triana Bridge| ©afloresm
Triana Bridge| ©afloresm

In my opinion you have to dedicate at least half a day. It is a neighborhood with a lot of charm and it is worth taking the visit calmly. Being a very famous destination for tapas routes you can arrive at lunchtime and burn a few calories with a walk along the banks of the Guadalquivir.

1. Stroll through the Castillo de San Jorge

Castle of San Jorge| ©Andres Guzman
Castle of San Jorge| ©Andres Guzman

The fortress is located just across the Isabel II Bridge (also known as the Triana bridge) and has guarded the river since the time of the Visigoths. Its origins are somewhat uncertain although it is thought to have been erected to defend the city from the attacks of Leovigild, a Gothic king who distinguished himself for his successful military campaigns.

The Castle of San Jorge reached its peak during the 15th century, the so-called "Golden Century". In fact, the Inquisition established its headquarters in the fortress in 1481 and occupied its premises until 1785.

Part of St. George's Castle was demolished in the nineteenth century and what remains houses a center for the interpretation of the ruins and religious repression.

Practical information

  • Address: Plaza del Altozano s/n
  • Hours: Tuesday to Saturday, from 10:00 to 13:30 and from 17:00 to 19:30. On Sundays and holidays you can visit from 10:00 to 13:30.
  • Price: admission is free

2. Admire the best dancers in town

Flamenco Show| ©Elliott Brown
Flamenco Show| ©Elliott Brown

If you are looking for a flamenco show in Seville, you are in the right neighborhood. It is said that the inventors of this art resided in Triana as it hosted a large gypsy community. To play it safe I recommend you to go to Teatro Flamenco Triana which **won TripAdvisor's "Travelers' Choice" in 2020.

There are shows daily at two times: at 19:30 and 21:00. The building is located at Calle Pureza 76, within walking distance of the Guadalquivir and the Capilla de los Marineros. If you can't find a place, you can opt for other tablaos such as Teatro Pura Esencia Flamenco (Calle Betis 56) and Baraka (Calle Pureza 107).

Book your ticket for a flamenco show

3. Discover the patios of Triana

San Eloy Courtyard in Triana, Seville| ©Agustin C
San Eloy Courtyard in Triana, Seville| ©Agustin C

This neighborhood concentrates the largest number of patios and corralas of all Seville. They are very beautiful and have the typical Andalusian charm. They cast shade and are dotted with climbing plants and vases.

On some occasions, the city council organizes visits to eight courtyards of Triana: Cerca Hermosa, Corral de Los Corchos, Casa Quemada, Hotel Triana, Corral Largo, Patio de las Flores, Corral San Jorge and Corral de la Encarnación. This event usually takes place during the fall.

Book a guided tour of Triana

4. Prepare a tapas tour

Tapas and Wine Tour| ©rob thompson
Tapas and Wine Tour| ©rob thompson

In Andalusia tapas is a way of life and its capital is no exception. Triana hosts an endless number of bars and taverns where you can eat well without spending an arm and a leg and the list below reveals the best ones:

  • Casa Ruperto, the temple of quails. It is a simple bar with a classic red awning and a white inscription. Its famous birds are raised in the province of Lérida and I assure you that they are delicious. I also recommend you to try the snail and cabrillas stew, a serranito or the pringá, a sandwich made with the meat from the stew (Avenida Santa Cecilia 2).
  • Bar Juan Carlos, the paradise of the cheesemongers. Its range of dairy products is impressive - there are more than 100 varieties - and is complemented by game pâtés, cecina, Galician octopus and other delicacies. It also stands out for its excellent national and international beers (Calle Febo 6).
  • Freiduría Reina Victoria, the ideal place to eat well battered codfish as well as baby squid, marinated fish, squid and much more. It is a simple establishment with large rooms and affordable prices (Calle Rodrigo de Triana 51).
  • Bar Salomón, the reference for pinchos and grilled meats (Calle López de Gómara 11).
  • Las Golondrinas, a must in Triana. There are two bars under the same name: the first is more traditional while the second has a contemporary style. Its specialties are sirloin tips, grilled mushrooms, Iberian cheeks and caballitos de jamón, a fried slice of bread covered with succulent ham (Calle Pagés del Corro).
  • Blanca Paloma, a neighborhood classic. Its fame is due to the bocaditos de mejillones, very tasty seafood croquettes. Other dishes to try are the eggplants stuffed with shrimp, anchovies or potatoes seasoned with mackerel (Calle San Jacinto 49).

Book a tapas tour in Seville

5. Sail on the Guadalquivir

Boat on the Guadalquivir| ©Mark Schofield
Boat on the Guadalquivir| ©Mark Schofield

The Guadalquivir is the only navigable river in Spain. Its placid waters are the attraction for thousands of Sevillians and tourists who come to the banks to canoe, walk or take a river cruise.

Most of the boat trips on the Guadalquivir leave from Triana. A few minutes after setting sail, the cruisers pass under an icon of Seville, the Isabel II Bridge.

They are not usually very long trips as they focus on the navigable canal built during the reign of Alfonso XIII. Depending on the amount paid, you will be entitled to a drink (glass of wine, beer, soft drink, etc.).

However, a new practice has been gaining popularity in recent years. Naturally I'm talking about Paddle Surf or SUP, a discipline that consists of moving on a surfboard upright, propelling each movement with a paddle. This sport was born in the sixties in Polynesia and little by little it has been gaining followers in other continents.

Balance is fundamental but with a little practice you will be able to move easily while developing your muscles. In Triana you can opt for Sup Guadalquivir (Mercado de Triana stall 29) or Paddle Surf Sevilla (Calle Betis 19).

Book a boat trip in Seville

6. Visit the Ceramics Center

At the Ceramics Center| ©Plothar
At the Ceramics Center| ©Plothar

The pottery industry is linked with a double thread to Triana. Ceramic production was concentrated in this part of the city and the center on Antillano Campos Street revives the handicraft tradition.

You will learn the vocabulary of the trade and see the 16th century kilns and a selection of stylish and colorful pieces.

The Ceramics Center is located behind the Triana Market and is open from 11:00 to 18:00 (Tuesday to Saturday) and from 10:00 to 15:00 (Sundays and holidays). The price is very affordable - around 2 € - and therefore worth spending a little time.

7. Book a tour of mysteries and legends

Chapel of the Virgen del Carmen| ©Kent Wang
Chapel of the Virgen del Carmen| ©Kent Wang

Triana is home to the Castillo de San Jorge, a fortress that was the seat of the Inquisition from the 15th to the 18th century.

Behind its walls confessions were extorted with very unorthodox methods and there were many who lost their lives after bloody tortures. The fort is wrapped in a web of legends that you can discover by booking a night walk in Seville.

It is not only the castle that is the protagonist of this story. Guided tours will take you to other parts of the neighborhood such as the Patio de Monipodio, Calle Pagés del Corro (the old Cava) or the Chapel of the Virgen del Carmen. Triana is linked to the birth of flamenco and maritime voyages, there is no shortage of stories to tell.

Practical information

  • Duration: 1 hour and a half
  • Price: about 10 €.

8. Relax on a terrace

Restaurant María Trifulca, in Seville| ©Abariltur
Restaurant María Trifulca, in Seville| ©Abariltur

Triana is located on the banks of the Guadalquivir and its tallest buildings overlook the old town. Thanks to its privileged position it enjoys incomparable views over Seville. If you travel to Seville in summer you can escape the heat in the terraces of the neighborhood.

Here are some options in the heights (or not) that will leave you breathless:

  • María Trifulca, the restaurant of the Sevillian jet set. It is not unusual to see some soccer player or other famous people and it is not surprising. It has a wide selection of dishes based on fresh fish and seafood such as the delicious white prawns or red tuna delicacies. There are also meat options as well as pastas, rice dishes and other delicacies. From its terrace you can admire the narrow streets of Triana, the Cathedral and the bullring (Plaza del Altozano 1).
  • Puerto de Cuba, the Mecca of the cocktail makers. Its terrace on the water is a privileged viewpoint towards the Torre de Oro and the ideal place to start the night with a drink (Calle Betis s/n).
  • Hotel Ribera de Triana, the perfect choice to treat yourself. You don't have to have a room to enjoy LEVEL 5th, a bar with a panoramic terrace, solarium and swimming pool. Its designer tables and loungers and the captivating blue light make for an exclusive and relaxing space (Plaza de Chapina s/n).
  • Betis 7 Triana Experience, a restaurant a stone's throw from the Isabel II Bridge. Its recipes reinterpret the Andalusian tradition by adding touches from the East, Italy and other world cuisines. To extend the evening and continue enjoying the view you can order a caipirinha or a Martini (Calle Betis 7).

9. Relive history in Betis street

Betis Street in Seville| ©Emilio Ortiz Coral
Betis Street in Seville| ©Emilio Ortiz Coral

It is the street that runs parallel to the river and its origin dates back to the eighteenth century when a great wall was built to contain the flooding of the Guadalquivir. What today is a busy destination for beers and tapas, in the past was full of sailors, merchants and admirals.

On this same street was the Universidad de Mareantes, a school that trained the crews that traveled between Seville and the Americas. Today there is no trace of it, but in its place is the Casa de las Columnas, an elegant building that today houses a community civic center. A ceramic plaque commemorates

Take your time to stroll around admiring the colorful facades of the houses and the panorama towards the other shore. By the way, if you are interested in viewpoints I recommend you to read the post about the best views of Seville.

10. Enter the Church of Santa Ana

Santa Ana Church| ©Anual
Santa Ana Church| ©Anual

At the intersection of Pureza, Vázquez de Leca, Bernardo Guerra and Pelay Correa streets stands a temple with more than seven centuries of history. It was built during the 13th century and was originally located outside the walls.

After the reconquest, the subsequent arrival of the Spaniards in America and the Lisbon earthquake, everything changed suddenly.

The baroque aspect gave way to the mixture of Mudejar and Gothic that we can appreciate today and the men returning from the colonies.

If you travel to Seville at the end of July you can enjoy its main event: the Novena to Señora Santa Ana. A tip: a few meters from the temple is De Triana, a store with clothes, accessories and objects linked to this traditional neighborhood.